Check It Off

One way to measure your success steps is to check off every task, the reading and research done, each mentoring session, networking event, relationship, meeting, publicity effort, or social media entry you do. This way you not only have a visual progress report but the salient fact is that you are definite about what you want to achieve.

Definite purpose of achievement equals 75% achievement.  Behaviorists certify that if your actions are synchronized with your achievement goals, you will tend to stay on track. If not, there’s a disconnect from purpose and you are far more likely to lose focus and become distracted and thereby mismanage your achievement.

Be driven, but not myopic. Yes, have your checklist and check off each active effort but be mindful that you also need to stay open and expectant of opportunities you may have never dreamed off. There is no way you can think of or know everything, absolutely no way. But, with a mentor or by consulting with others about what you intend to achieve, you open to the universe of limitless options.

See yourself.  People who consistently win self-evaluate. They achieve based on fact or evidence and have limited space for denial, fantasy or fiction. Achievers, for the most part, are self-critical rather than delusional about their dream and they hold themselves to higher, realistic standards.  Outcome based people embrace the truth about themselves and about what they intend to achieve, since they recognize that nothing else will make their vision obtainable.

The other 25% in the success quotient is persistence. Diligence pays off. Success requires finish line management. Those who achieve, regardless of what it is they want to do, consistently manage their challenges according to the top priority. They commit to managing their first priority first rather than follow the shibboleth of reverse priority that oftentimes becomes a destructive distraction. Winners check off priority one.

“Being busy does not always mean real work. The object of all work is production or accomplishment and to either of these ends there must be forethought, system, planning, intelligence, and honest purpose, as well as perspiration. Seeming to do is not doing.” ~Thomas Edison

Perceived obstacles crumble against persistent desire. Do the work and not just appear busy checking off the small, less impact things on your priority checklist. Effective, efficient action is the best check it off success system you can have.

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Fantastic Friday: Cullen Jones

Cullen Jones

How do you become an Olympian?  Soon media attention will be focused on the 2012 Olympic Games in London, the spotlight will also be on Olympic gold medal winner, Cullen Jones.  He didn’t start out as a child prodigy swimmer. In the early years after his Mom enrolled him in swim classes after a near drowning almost twenty years ago, Cullen says he found himself plodding away in the outside lanes before his long hours finally paid off.

He will compete in the 50-meter and 100-meter freestyle events and the 4×100-meter freestyle relay in London.  Jones is the third African-American to make the US Olympic swimming team after Anthony Ervin and Maritza Correia.  At the 2008 Olympic swimming trials, Jones broke the American record in the 50 meter freestyle with a time of 21.59.  In the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, he won a gold medal in the 4×100 m freestyle relay in a world record time of 3:08.24 with Michael Phelps, Jason Lezak and Garrett Weber-Gale and in 2009, Jones set the American record in the 50-meter freestyle at the U.S. National Championships in Indianapolis.

Swimming has paid off for Cullen Jones not only in the Olympic arena but also as a heartthrob role model who is getting national and international endorsements.  Cullen is excited about the sport of swimming and competing in a few weeks in London as a returning athlete swimmer. Jones likes being a role model for young black aspiring swimmers, something he did not have when he  began perfecting his strokes as a swimmer. In his early years, he was teased and bullied in his New Jersey neighborhood.

“Black children drown at a rate of more than three times that of white children, and a recent study sponsored by USA Swimming said that 58 percent of black children can’t swim. Jones didn’t realize the disparity in the sport until he was about 15 and started competing hard-core” writes ESPN reporter Elizabeth Merrill.  Jone is  on a mission to change that glaring statistic, one reason why he started the Cullen Jones Diversity Tour (www.cullenjones.com).

You become an Olympic swimmer one stroke at a time.

GO!

Go! On your mark, get set, ready, GO! This is the time, today, to go for what you want.  It doesn’t matter how farfetched your dream, how remote your goal, or how immeasurable your vision. What matters is that you have a dream, a goal or a vision.

It is time to go for it; get into the race for the finish line-the attainment of victory. Today is your day to take one elongated step and then another and then another until you are draped with or crowned a success.  No more wallowing, no more wondering, and no more wavering, go.

Tomorrow is twenty-four hours away, that won’t get you to finish today. Today is your GO day.  Garner your energy, renew your purpose, feel deeply your passion and GO!  Inculcate success; take on the confidence of an Olympic athlete for a moment.  They practice and train to respond to the word GO.

Be an athlete. Be you and never succumb to wariness. There are times in life that you feel tired and frustrated: tired of trying to make it in spite of all that you do, tired of waiting for your business to grow, tired of dealing with sickness, tired of a difficult boss.  You may feel tired of it all; that’s the time to GO!

Pump up your endorphins. Go on, hold on a little bit longer, and see the victorious end in colorful splendor.  You can’t allow yourself to become weary. You can’t be tempted to quit pursuing your goals and dreams -not now. Exactly what you want is right ahead.

Belief creates its verification.” ~William James

The dreariest moment is right before a victory. The darkest time of the night is right before dawn. The weariness of defeat is right before your success.  Claude Bristol in The Magic of Believing says the problem with most people is that they give up and get weary too soon.  They lose their passion, they discard their dreams, and they tell themselves they are a failure inches before what they wish is claimed.

The magic of believing is that you set your passion thermostat, you decide the pace, and you, and only you, own the mental fortitude to win.  Bristol says, “it needs to be in the spirit-that the work has already been done…actually see yourself successful.”

You are magic-believe it.

Now, GO!