Monday Miracle: Visualization

Human Eye with different lines. The line of si...

Human Eye with different lines. The line of sight (middle) is the only one permitting a view with good acuity. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

What do you see? How clear is your vision? How magnificent is your visualization?

In order  for your goals to materialize, you must have a vivid, electrifying visualization of what you want to achieve.  There are four parts of visualization – learn and assiduously practice each step every day to capture the incredible power of seeing what you want.

  1. Daily Diligence

The first step of visualization is daily practice, the frequency  that you visualize the achievement of your goal by seeing yourself in your mind’s eye accomplishing exactly what you want is the impetus you need to marshal your success. The more often you repeat a clear mental picture of your very best performance or the achievement of the goal, the more rapidly it will manifest as part of your reality.

2.  Duration

The second step of visualization is duration, how long you maintain your mental picture.  The length of  time that you can hold your visual image (it should not be a full n length movie) deepens your ability to attract what you need and see the actions required to complete your goal.  The duration depends on you, some may need more time to vividly see their achievement and others may only need seconds to inculcate their image. Take your time, do what serves your highest need.

 “Achievement, of whatever kind, is the crown of effort, the diadem of thought.” ~Elbert Hubbard

3.  Direction

The third step of visualization is direction. There is a direct, one-to-one relationship between how vividly clear you can see the direction of your goal or result in your mind and how quickly it comes into your reality. Your ability to directly cast the goal in your mind is what transmutes desire directly and determines how quickly your visual image materializes.

4.  Desire

The fourth element of visualization is intense desire, how badly do you want to achieve your goal. The intensity of your desire and the strength of the emotion that you attach to your visual image is vital to achievement. This is the most important and powerful part of the visualization process.

Visualization is a process, as is success. Work the process and it will work for you.

Vivid visualization + volition = success.

Make a Mistake Right

created by Stuart Miles                                                                                    (graphic created by Stuart Miles)

Have you ever made a mistake?

Do you regret some mistake you’ve made? Of course. If you are breathing and not in denial, regardless of how long you have lived you have made mistakes and assuredly you have regrets about some of them. Threats to your confidence come and go, but you can change a threat into a treat! Find opportunity

Mistakes happen! That’s right, mistakes are a human frailty which are a consequence of the mind’s ability to make choices.  Humans are the only species on earth who have the capacity of thought and reason. Some choices are on target and others lead to mistakes. But, there are teaching moments and learning points even when you make a mistake. Don’t fret!

What you can do about it?

  1. Remind yourself that mistakes happen. Don’t beat yourself up and create negative energy around a happenstance mistake. Lingering in the fear of making a mistake is actually an act of self sabotage.
  2. Consider the mistake to be a right mistake. It could be a blessing in disguise.  The change precipitated by that choice could actually guide you to alternate options you would never have considered.  It’s quite possible for your new open-eyed view to lead you to an experience which is more beneficial; this regularly happens.
  3. Think about it. A right mistake usually prompts introspection. As is written in Climb Every Obstacle: Eliminate Your Limits!, mistakes magnify learning. If you take the time to graciously learn from your mistake, rather than ignoring it or being angry about it, you will begin to see its learning value.

Dig deep into the mistake.

BEWARE: If you are making mistakes that throw off your focus, skew your self-worth, damage another person, or create chaos – then what you are doing is probably not a mistake. Such behaviorism indicates fear. They even point to a deep sense of unworthiness.

Oprah columnist Martha Beck advises to be still in those moments. She says,“If we’re still enough to hear our own inner voices at this subtle, almost silent level, we tend to choose the course through life that feels most blessed and least traumatic.” Work that ego-centered pain out. Dig in, get an answer to the question why did this happen.

HALT. Stop before the distress starts. It’s unnecessary to beat yourself up. Instead, do something that diverts harmful emotions instantly. Don’t allow that pesky inner voice of past pain to ruin your true presence of goodness and goodwill.

Mistakes are a part of success. For one thing, they often improve your problem-solving skills. Those who avoid mistakes ultimately avoid success.

“The greatest mistake you can make is to be continuously fearing that you will make one.” ~Elbert Hubbard

Every right mistake has a right solution.

What is Love?

Woody Allen makes a point here:

“To love is to suffer. To avoid suffering, one must not love. But then, one suffers from not loving. Therefore, to love is to suffer; not to love is to suffer; to suffer is to suffer. To be happy is to love. To be happy, then, is to suffer, but suffering makes one unhappy. Therefore, to be happy, one must love or love to suffer or suffer from too much happiness.”

Whether you think Woody Allen’s comment is funny or not does not matter (I think it is privately humorous), the question here is what is love?

American relationship/marriage statistics are alarming (if you choose to focus on the divorce probability) unless you counterbalance those data numbers with heart memories. This is one reason I often refer to a book written by Julie Rainbow, Standing the Test of Time, that debunks the myth of divorced, dysfunctional Black families as she tells the story of Black couples who have been married fifty years or more and are still standing together.

I have other reasons for my knowing about love, my parents. My parents were married 53 years (until my Dad’s death in 2008) and his last words on this earth were to my Mom, saying “I love you.” Their eternal bond taught me something.

Adding another personal note, now that I have eulogized two brothers, one my twin, but both whom I loved deeply, I had to ask myself what am I learning about life through this experience?  I have been taught that love is a jewel that sparkles as brightly as you do. Well, I want to dazzle because that is the type of love that I want before I leave this earthly plane!

I have learned that “love” endures pain. It is an unquestioned face that relationships that mark years of longevity face pain. Even so, the pain of infidelity, disaster, trauma, or other disruptive issues do not destroy the core of love between two people who are devoted to each other.

I have learned that “love” smells different. Sometimes love stinks. But, like you learn to love your baby’s poop, love is the reason. Other times love smells like a fragrant rose, scented by time and passion. Love among two people may smell different from time to time, but each smell you learn to love.

I have learned that “love” ages. The longer you bottle love the more of an aged bouquet it has. Time and stillness together can create a bonus of a barrel of savory love.

What love is is individual. My impression of love is distinct from yours and you can bet yours is distinct from mine. When I was younger I equated love with lust, thus a divorce as soon as the hots cooled off. Now after taking years of celibacy instruction to heart, I have learned that even though love may lead to suffering, I’ll suffer any day for the aged, sweetness of love.

The Right Mistake

Have you ever made a mistake? Do you regret some mistakes? Of course, if you are breathing that is, you have made mistakes and assuredly you have regrets about some of them.

Mistakes happen! That’s right, mistakes are a human calamity that come with the ability to make choices. Sometimes the choices you and I make are on point and other times our choices lead to mistakes.

What can you do about it?

First off, remind yourself that mistakes happen to all of us, so don’t beat yourself up and create negative energy around a happenstance mistake so long as it is not a sabotage.

If you are making mistakes that threaten your focus, skew your self worth, damage another person, or create chaos – then what you are doing is probably not a mistake, but a deeper causative response to a sense of senseless unworthiness. Work that ego-centered pain out right away and do not allow the inner voice of past pain ruin your presence of goodness and goodwill.

Second, have you considered the mistake to be a right mistake? It could be a blessing in disguise that you made that particular mistake which could actually guide you to alternate choices and open-eyed new views or information that could benefit you and alter conditions.

Right mistakes usually produce good results. Truly, right mistakes that are often judged awful at the time could blend into a higher shift in reality. I know two people who made simple mistakes in their job responsibility that set into motion a termination. Although devastated at first about the injustice of the firings, they have both created new livelihoods which they both love.

I recently heard a author tell her story about being downsized and subsequently not being able to find a new position turn to writing her book which had been simmering in her mind for more than 15 years. The right mistake here is that she previously ignored her promptings to showcase her talent. The good news is that in 2010 Patricia published, The Art of Standing Still. Patricia Walden used her situation of being downsized to the advantage of writing a powerful testimony about standing still when still does not mean stuck.

Third, a right mistake causes introspection. As I have written in Climb Every Obstacle: Eliminate Your Limits!, mistakes magnify learning. If you take the time to graciously learn from your mistake, rather than ignoring the lesson embedded within, you will begin to see truth contained within for your review.

Mistakes are a part of success; they improve your problem-solving skills. Those who avoid mistakes, avoid success. Elbert Hubbard says, “The greatest mistake you can make is to be continuously fearing that you will make one.”

Every right mistake has a solution.