75 Questions: Question 1

There are 75 days before the start of a new Gregorian calendar year. So, for the next 74 days (Monday – Sunday) the blog postings will ask you one question. That question may inspire you, it may perplex you, it may anger you, or it may tickle you. The whole thrust of the 75 questions is to prompt a reaction and honest answer to the probe.

The honest intent of the 75 questions is to capture change. The questions are to be a catalyst for inner change that leaves you feeling more dynamic, powerful, intrigued, and authentic. When these salient emotions are opened up within you (they already exist), you change and your world changes and the whole world changes with you.

Post your answers, I will post a response to your replies and we will use these 75 questions to lift life as the year 2017 begins.

Question 1:  What did you learn from making a mistake?

 

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Make a Mistake Right

created by Stuart Miles                                                                                    (graphic created by Stuart Miles)

Have you ever made a mistake?

Do you regret some mistake you’ve made? Of course. If you are breathing and not in denial, regardless of how long you have lived you have made mistakes and assuredly you have regrets about some of them. Threats to your confidence come and go, but you can change a threat into a treat! Find opportunity

Mistakes happen! That’s right, mistakes are a human frailty which are a consequence of the mind’s ability to make choices.  Humans are the only species on earth who have the capacity of thought and reason. Some choices are on target and others lead to mistakes. But, there are teaching moments and learning points even when you make a mistake. Don’t fret!

What you can do about it?

  1. Remind yourself that mistakes happen. Don’t beat yourself up and create negative energy around a happenstance mistake. Lingering in the fear of making a mistake is actually an act of self sabotage.
  2. Consider the mistake to be a right mistake. It could be a blessing in disguise.  The change precipitated by that choice could actually guide you to alternate options you would never have considered.  It’s quite possible for your new open-eyed view to lead you to an experience which is more beneficial; this regularly happens.
  3. Think about it. A right mistake usually prompts introspection. As is written in Climb Every Obstacle: Eliminate Your Limits!, mistakes magnify learning. If you take the time to graciously learn from your mistake, rather than ignoring it or being angry about it, you will begin to see its learning value.

Dig deep into the mistake.

BEWARE: If you are making mistakes that throw off your focus, skew your self-worth, damage another person, or create chaos – then what you are doing is probably not a mistake. Such behaviorism indicates fear. They even point to a deep sense of unworthiness.

Oprah columnist Martha Beck advises to be still in those moments. She says,“If we’re still enough to hear our own inner voices at this subtle, almost silent level, we tend to choose the course through life that feels most blessed and least traumatic.” Work that ego-centered pain out. Dig in, get an answer to the question why did this happen.

HALT. Stop before the distress starts. It’s unnecessary to beat yourself up. Instead, do something that diverts harmful emotions instantly. Don’t allow that pesky inner voice of past pain to ruin your true presence of goodness and goodwill.

Mistakes are a part of success. For one thing, they often improve your problem-solving skills. Those who avoid mistakes ultimately avoid success.

“The greatest mistake you can make is to be continuously fearing that you will make one.” ~Elbert Hubbard

Every right mistake has a right solution.